Local Author and Illustrator Event

Meet Our Favorite

Local Authors and Illustrators

Saturday, June 25th, from 11-2

at Oodles 4 Kids!

Oodles 4 Kids is delighted to have you meet some of the literary luminaries of Portland! These writers and illustrators will read from their latest and greatest published works, sign your purchases and chat about what inspired their writings and illustrations.

We’ll be featuring a brand new line, Write Brain, that encourages kids to learn to write creatively. Bring the kiddos in to write a story based on lively images. The writings then can be published, turning their words into a hard-covered or soft-covered book to be treasured forever!

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 Bart King

“I live in Portland, Oregon, where I’ve taught middle school for some time. Oh, and I’m delighted to say that my books have won the Newberry Award, the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize in Literature. (Of course, being delighted to say something doesn’t make it true!)”

King is beloved in children’s literature for his best-selling books that include “The Big Book of Girl Stuff,” “The Big Book of Boy Stuff,” The Big Book of Superheroes” and “The Pocket Guide to Mischief.”

“The Drake Equation” (hot off the press May 10, 2016) is the story of Noah Grow, a bird-watcher. If you’re picturing some kid in a big floppy hat, peering up into the trees through giant binoculars…well, good job. That’s exactly what he does. Right now, Noah is on a quest to find a wood duck. According to his calculations, a.k.a., the Drake Equation, the odds are good–really good–for spotting one.

That’s why he gets off the bus at the wrong stop. And that’s how he ends up running down a hill, crashing into a fence and landing right next to a strange, glittery disk.

Noah and his best friends, Jason and Jenny, soon discover that the mysterious disk, is, well, mysterious. It gives Noah peculiar powers. As things go from odd to outrageous, Noah is swept up in a storm of intergalactic intrigue and middle-school mayhem. There’s much more at stake than Noah realizes.

Bart King delivers a hilarious sci-fi adventure with just the right mix of heart and humor that will have readers looking out for birds–and strange alien objects.

“A charmingly madcap science fiction adventure for the middle grade crowd.”

-Kim, GoodReads librarian

Kevin Diller and Justin Lowe

Long ago and far, far away–well, Los Angeles, actually–Kevin Diller started out as a screenwriter and playwright before turning to producing T.V. commercials. Fatherhood brought him back to writing, and he happily works on children’s books.

Justin Lowe is an artist and a filmmaker, who somehow entered adulthood with his child-like imagination entirely intact. Justin was raised on a steady diet of Dr. Seuss, Jim Henson and apple juice, which he is pretty sure is what led him to write “Octicorn.”

Meet Octicorn, the funny, sweet and disarming character who is a champion for anyone who has ever felt a little different. And isn’t that everyone? Octicorn is half octopus, half unicorn, half confused…which sometimes make it hard to fit in. But maybe that’s not such a bad thing.

One of Oodles’ all-time favorites, “Octicorn” charms every reader with his humorously mixed heritage (a cross between a unicorn and an octopus) and tongue-in-cheek honesty. Diller and Lowe collaborated to create this funny, yet poignant, picture-book story of self-love and acceptance.

  Joe Kurmaskie

Joe Kurmaskie, a.k.a., The Metal Cowboy, is an award-winning journalist, travel writer, performer and author of seven creative non-fiction books, memoirs and story collections packed with humor, pathos and a full accounting of the human condition. The constant throughout is that everything is experienced and recounted from the seat of a bicycle. Really, he just loves riding books and telling stories that happen in and beyond his Sellwood zip code.

Just published in May is Kurmaskie’s “A Guide to Falling Down in Public,” the fifth in his continuing saga of biking adventures that have been compared to the humorous writings of Mark Twain and David Sedaris. His other books include “Metal Cowboy,” “Riding Outside the Lines,” Momentum is Your Friend,” “Joyride,” “You Might Be a Cyclist If” and “Mud, Sweat and Gears.” He’s been a contributing writer to Bicycling Magazine, Details, The Oregonian, Men’s Journal, WSJ, Outside and Parenting and was an editor for six years at an AP newspaper.

“A Guide to Falling Down in Public” hits the open road in high gear and never looks back. Whether he’s out-sprinting African elephants and dictators in Zimbabwe; confounding Mexican freedom fighters in Copper Canyon with nothing more than broken Spanish, questionable geopolitical skills and the magic of a bicycle; taking a man and his lover’s ashes on one last ride on a tandem; or riding down awful truths and celebrating beautiful wrecks on five continents, Kurmaskie has mastered the painful art of falling down and the flat-out rush of getting back up again.

This collection is a kaleidoscope of exuberant cycling adventure stories spanning four decades and thirty countries. It embraces the absurdity of living at any speed, the fragility in each of us the world over, and the simple wonders waiting just up the road.

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Danny Popovici

Danny Popovici was once three years old. At that time, he moved from Romania to Portland with dreams of growing into an adult. Fast forward some time and now wishes to be a kid again. In 2010 he graduated from Art College and has been making a career drawing pictures. Danny specializes in picture book illustrations, water color painting, urban sketching, and visual development for animation and games. His beautiful oil illustrations in “World on a String” received the 2014 Children’s Picture Book Discovery Prize and the 2013 “Best Illustrator” Moonbeam Children’s Book Award.

Popovici lives in the Sellwood neighborhood where he is often seen on a walk with his mild-mannered Australian Shepherd, Ollie.

“World on a String” is the picture-book story of a balloon on a heart-string. When his best friend, a big red balloon, comes untied in a thunderstorm, Charlie is overcome with sadness. However, inspired by the happy memories of his best friend, Charlie is able to shift his perspective and, ultimately, he imagines his balloon on an amazing journey into the starry night.

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